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Harlequin Diamonds ~ Cosmic Latte and Black ~ Large fabric by peacoquettedesigns on Spoonflower - custom fabric

Preview scale: 24 x 24 inches

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24.05in x 20.61in, 262 pixels/inch,
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NOTE: Not recommended for use on even slightly textured walls. For children’s rooms, we recommend buying our Smooth wallpaper.

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Horizontal: 1
Vertical: 1
Total: $0.00
On Basic Cotton Ultra per yard $ In stock
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By Sarah Walden

Historically accurate reproductions from antique sources is my specialty, but I'm often inspired to transform them into exciting contemporary prints. Customization and licensing available. What can I make for you?

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Description:

A charming harlequin diamond pattern in Cosmic Latte cream and black. See peacoquette.com for customization information.

About "Cosmic Latte" From Wikipedia: In 2001, Karl Glazebrook and Ivan Baldry determined that the color of the universe was a greenish white, but they soon corrected their analysis in a 2002 paper,[1] in which they reported that their survey of the color of all light in the universe added up to a slightly beigeish white. The survey included more than 200,000 galaxies, and measured the spectral range of the light from a large volume of the universe. The hexadecimal RGB value for Cosmic Latte is #FFF8E7. The finding of the "color of the universe" was not the focus of the study, which was examining spectral analysis of different galaxies to study star formation. Like Fraunhofer lines, the dark lines displayed in the study's spectral ranges display older and younger stars and allow Glazebrook and Baldry to determine the age of different galaxies and star systems. What the study revealed is that the overwhelming majority of stars formed about 5 billion years ago. Because these stars would have been "brighter" in the past, the color of the universe changes over time shifting from blue to red as more blue stars change to yellow and eventually red giants. Glazebrook's and Baldry's work was funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. As light from distant galaxies reaches the Earth, the average "color of the universe" (as seen from Earth) marginally increases towards pure white, due to the light coming from the stars when they were much younger and bluer.

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